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How Much Money Can I Make as an AWS CWI?

Have you decided to pursue an AWS CWI certification? If this is the case, you have probably spent countless hours doing your research to make sure you meet the requirements.

But of course, what you really want to know is how much money you can make as a CWI. If you want to know, keep reading this article.

What is a CWI?

Before you learn how much a CWI makes, you need to learn a little bit more about the nature of the work.

A CWI stands for a certified welding inspector. CWIs are essential to a variety of construction fields.

CWIs have a number of important responsibilities each day to ensure the quality of a construction project.

When working at a job site, CWIs have to inspect for a variety of things such as compliance with city and state laws, federal safety regulations, and company-specific guidelines.

When a construction project is in full swing, an inspector has to monitor the welding operations to ensure compliance to welding procedures.

If you want to become a CWI, you need 5 years industry experience if you have a high school diploma, if you do not have a high school diploma don’t fret, you can still become a CWI but will need more industry experience. It also helps to have a background in engineering, CWI prep courses, or a similar field.

The American Welding Society offers a certified welding inspector certification you can complete.

Reasons to Become a CWI

Aside from a substantial salary, there are other reasons why many people choose to become CWIs.

For starters, the benefits are great. When you're part of a company, you will receive health insurance, 401k, and other benefits.

If you don't like to stay put in one place, a CWI career might be the right move for you. Becoming a CWI will allow you more freedom and more travel opportunities to choose where you want to work.

Also, when you become a CWI, you never stop learning. You will get the opportunity to learn from professionals and develop your skills further.

How Much Does a CWI Make?

For a lot of people deciding on a specific career depends a lot on the salary. It's no different for CWIs.

The average salary for a CWI pays $72K a year, with overtime included. The hourly rate is about $26.64 an hour. Most reports show CWIs rack up an average of 17 hours of overtime a week.

The salary of a CWI has grown over the past few years. In 2013, the average salary was $58,000 a year. This number was an increase from $38,410 a year in 2012.

Of course, this salary varies by location. Some of the lowest salaries for a CWI reported were $44K a year in the state of Idaho.

Meanwhile, New York and DC have some of the highest salaries in the industry reported between $80k and 83K a year.

Becoming an AWS CWI: The Bottom Line

There's no doubt CWIs can make a decent salary. Salaries depending on location can range from $44K to $83K a year. Not to mention you'll receive competitive benefits and a chance to travel.

Are you interested in obtaining an AWS CWI certification? Look no further.

Let us help you pursue your career with our complete CWI exam prep course.

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Another Happy Graduate of AINDT!

Hey guys,

I just finished my first week and thought I'd share what it has been like. Of course, I'm just assisting on these for now, but once I get my certs, I'll be out there on my own doing this stuff.

Day 1: MT on welds for a piece to be used by a private space exploration company.

Day2: UT lamination scans on large steel plates used for construction of a new ferry.

Day 3: PT on welds for ferry construction; UT shear wave on pipe welds

Day 4: UT thickness gauging the hull of a small freighter

Day 5: UT thickness gauging safety pins on the top of a grain elevator (about 100 feet up, harnessed and dangling off the roof); MT on a repair weld for the boom of a cement truck

Never know what the day will hold for me, and I really like that. No RT, which is unfortunate. We've mostly got maritime customers, but it seems like there is quite a bit of railroad, construction, paper mill, and manufacturing customers, too.

It's a good gig. I'll let you know when another position opens up.

Thanks again for everything,

Morris
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Understanding Hydrogen Induced Cold Cracking in Welds

Karsten Madsen | Apr 26, 2017

https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/understanding-hydrogen-induced-cold-cracking-welds-karsten-madsen

"Like others, I probably contributed to some weld cracking earlier in my career through ignorance about the effects of hydrogen on some metals. Problem #1 … working as a young Welder, there was usually a stash of 7018 electrodes somewhere handy saving a trip to the holding oven. Problem #2 … I'm showing my age in saying that at that time, microwave ovens had not yet showed up in cafeterias to warm up meals. No problems though as electrode ovens did a good job of heating up leftover mac 'n cheese or a can of baked beans for a warm dinner.

Adding to our ignorance, the welding rods used in both of these circumstances seemed none the worse for the wear making welds that appeared to be acceptable. So the loosely applied rules about keeping the electrodes only in dry holding ovens and used within 4 hours did not seem to justify compliance. Moisture absorbed by SMAW electrode flux coating is only one source of hydrogen entering a weld deposit. It can also exist in FCAW wires, SAW flux or come from high ambient humidity or lubricants used in other manufacturing processes. Moisture of course is hydrogen and oxygen while oils and greases are usually hydrocarbons.

My intent here is to explain in understandable terms why it is so important to control weld exposure to hydrogen for those higher strength steels that are susceptible to hydrogen induced cold cracking (HICC). I’m not a Metallurgist and I may be taking some liberties in the following explanation, but to me at least hearing the effects of HICC first hand and my analogies to explain this phenomenon seem to make sense."

Click here to read more about the strategy.

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NDT Training: The Best Investment You'll Ever Make

Source: http://www.bergeng.com/blog/choose-a-career-in-ndt-nondestructive-testing/

Title: Choose A Career In Nondestructive Testing

Make A Great Living In A Growing Sector

"It’s no secret that the US economy, and the global economy in general, have seen some tough times. Many sectors were slow to recover from the 2008 recession, and for the American middle class, things aren’t getting much easier.

In many career fields, an expensive college education leads to a middle class income saddled with student loan debt. NDT (nondestructive testing) is one incredible exception. A career in nondestructive testing requires a relatively small investment in education, and the payoff is an excellent salary.

Just how excellent is that salary? Glad you asked. We researched education and salaries for various careers and compared the results to a typical NDT salary, as reported by PQNDT in their annual NDT salary survey. Check it out–and check out the full survey from PQNDT. Whether you’re a seasoned NDT professional or you’re considering a career in NDT, the survey from PQNDT is an incredible resource."

Please include attribution to http://www.bergeng.com/blog/ with this graphic.

Choose A Career In Nondestructive Testing: Make A Great Living In A Growing Sector

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Emerging Growth Markets for NDT


b2ap3_thumbnail_iStock_000013773964_Medium_20130708-155821_1.jpgSource: 
http://www.ndt.org/news.asp?objectid=50229

The emerging markets for NDT inspection services are Brazil, China, India, and South Africa. Surprisingly, of these markets, China is the smallest. This is due to the trend in China wherein end-user industries prefer performing NDT inspections in-house rather than outsourcing. Similar to the global NDT inspection services market, these emerging growth markets are characterized by a large number of competitors, although most participants are relatively small. 

End-user industries such as oil and gas and power generation are the key drivers. High oil and gas prices have ensured that the operators earn significant revenue. This revenue has been duly invested back into developing the infrastructure in the energy industry.

To read more of the Industry Report,Click Here.

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